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  • 23 of 32 copies available at Bibliomation. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Salem Free Public Library.

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0 current holds with 32 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Salem Free Public Library YB JOHNSON (Text to phone) 33640143768053 Young Adult Biography Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780374312718
  • ISBN: 0374312710
  • Physical Description: ix, 304 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Farrar Straus Giroux, 2020.

Content descriptions

Formatted Contents Note:
Introduction: Black. Queer. Here -- A different kid. Smile ; Identity ; "Honeychild" ; Fags play football, too ; "Honest Abe" lied to me ; You can't swim in cowboy boots - Family. Dear little brother ; Nanny: the caregiver, the hustler, my best friend ; Daddy's second chance ; Losing hope ; Dear Mommy ; A lesson before dying -- Teenagers. Boys will be boys ; The prom kings we never were ; Setting myself free or setting myself up? -- Friends. Caught in a haze ; Losing my virginity twice ; Don't know why I didn't call -- Afterword: All boys aren't blue.
Summary, etc.:
In a series of personal essays, prominent journalist and LGBTQIA+ activist George M. Johnson explores his childhood, adolescence, and college years in New Jersey and Virginia. From the memories of getting his teeth kicked out by bullies at age five, to flea marketing with his loving grandmother, to his first sexual relationships, this young-adult memoir weaves together the trials and triumphs faced by Black queer boys.
Subject: Johnson, George M. (George Matthew), 1985-
African American gay men > Biography.
Gays > Identity.
Genre: Autobiographies.

Syndetic Solutions - School Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9780374312718
All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto
All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto
by Johnson, George M.; M, Johnson, George
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School Library Journal Review

All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto

School Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 9 Up--Journalist and activist Johnson takes readers through his life from childhood through young adulthood, reflecting on how his identity as a queer Black boy was shaped, refracted, and often suppressed for his own safety. Growing up in New Jersey, Johnson recounts becoming aware of his "difference" and how it necessitated choices between who he was and who he felt pressured to be. Part memoir and part manifesto, the text infuses personal reflections with observations about white supremacy, toxic masculinity, homophobia, and how these concepts affected him, whether as a boy forced to choose football over double dutch at recess or as a fraternity pledge struggling to come out on campus. Separated into acts, the book describes different members of his community (family, teenagers, friends)--a stylistic demonstration of his valuable support system that occasionally makes the narrative choppy. Still, the various tangents don't detract from the book's power, and the conversational tone will leave readers feeling like they are sitting with an insightful friend. There are a few detailed depictions of sexual situations and an incident of sexual abuse by a family member. Johnson handles the painful, complicated feelings around this experience with an honesty and tone appropriate for the intended audience. VERDICT This young adult memoir is a contemporary hallmark of the blossoming genre. Johnson anchors the text with encouragement and realistic guidance for queer Black youth. Recommended for YA nonfiction collections where autobiographical and social justice titles are popular.--Ashleigh Williams, School Library Journal

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9780374312718
All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto
All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto
by Johnson, George M.; M, Johnson, George
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BookList Review

All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

With this title, Johnson offers his memoir-manifesto of growing up queer before he had the language to know exactly what that meant. Split into three parts, Johnson's book shares intimate stories of his childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood as he navigates family, friends, and the performance of masculinity. Discussion of his stories includes theory and statistical information that tie his ideas and struggles in with a larger intersectional identity. Johnson struggles with finding his YA voice. Though it's clear that his stories and experiences are formative to his identity as a Black queer boy (now man), they pour out with an intensity that may lead readers to feelings of confusion about the main point of the book. The severe lack of #OwnVoices books from Black queer men makes this title an absolute necessity, but it may fall to the wayside for cultural outsiders. Nevertheless, the personal stories and the healing and reconciliation of self in this title are all undeniably honest and relatable--a reminder of our shared imperfection and humanity.

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9780374312718
All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto
All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto
by Johnson, George M.; M, Johnson, George
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Publishers Weekly Review

All Boys Aren't Blue : A Memoir-Manifesto

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Billed as a "memoir-manifesto," Johnson's debut is a collection of heartfelt personal essays revolving around themes of identity and family. Growing up black and queer in New Jersey and Virginia, Johnson feels a tension between these two identities, even before he's fully conceptualized what makes him stand out from others in his close-knit family. The loving Elder/Johnson clan, led by witty matriarch Nanny (whose take on familial loyalty and intimacy is "You might have to wipe my ass one day"), includes Johnson's cousin Hope, a trans woman who models pride and self-determination. Johnson makes impassioned declarations about the importance of community and inclusive sex education, and the freedom to define oneself outside of society's conditioning. Though at first glance the book lacks the synthesizing call to action that "manifesto" would imply, its "be yourself" message remains a radical stance for doubly marginalized individuals. Johnson's writing is a stylistic hodgepodge of anecdotes ("story time," he periodically declares) and letters to relatives. In a publishing landscape in need of queer black voices, readers who are sorting through similar concepts will be grateful to join him on the journey. 14--up. (Apr.)


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